ANNE OF GREEN GABLES by L.M. Montgomery

anneThis is one of those books that I read more than once. The edition is a horrible cheap Penguin paperback, but for 50 p. what I can ask for. And, at that moment, I need absolutely to have the book and read it again, this time in English.

It is one of those books that cheer you up with each page. The red-hair girl makes me laugh easily with her ideas and her passion for life. The beginning of the books it is a continuo remind of her poor upbringing until she has the luck to arrive at Cuthbert’s house. Matthew and Marilla, a brother and sister, who never married and have Anne even although she is not a boy.

But, the truth is that she lights their house and make them feel alive. She always looks around with wonder and positive expectations and make us readers be part of that particular view of the world.

For this kind of sentences I love Anne:

“I’ve made up my mind to enjoy this drive. It’s been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind firmly that you will.”

“Miss Marilla Cuthbert is a very kind lady who has taken me to bring up properly. She is doing her best, but it is very discouraging work.”

Lucy Maud Montgomery OBE(November 30, 1874– April 24, 1942), publicly known as MotgmomeryL. M. Montgomery, was a Canadian author best known for a series of novels beginning in 1908 with Anne of Green Gables. The book was an immediate success. The central character, Anne, an orphaned girl, made Montgomery famous in her lifetime and gave her an international following. The first novel was followed by a series of sequels with Anne as the central character. Montgomery went on to publish 20 novels as well as 530 short stories, 500 poems, and 30 essays. Most of the novels were set in Prince Edward Island , and locations within Canada’s smallest province became literary landmarks and popular tourist sites—namely Green Gables farm, the genesis of Prince Edward Island National Park. She was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935. (There were no Canadian orders, decorations or medals for civilians until the 1970s.)

Montgomery’s work, diaries and letters have been read and studied by scholars and readers worldwide.

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